Technological improvements in healthcare are expected to yield recovery improvements in even the worst workplace injuries. A presentation on wearable technologies shared both current and future applications expected in the field. A major topic of relevance to Minneapolis employees seeking workers’ compensation was how these wearable technologies coincide with the needs of those who have experienced catastrophic and chronic injuries.

Also termed assistive technology, the wearable technology industry has begun addressing the needs of workers with orthopedic injuries. Large exoskeletons are under development for providing increased mobility in cases of paralysis. The presentation pointed to use of smaller scale exoskeletons now being used to address damaged knee and hip joints. The devices could be cost prohibitive on the open market, but workers’ compensation may be able to help with the medical expenses.

Medical professionals and claims adjusters gained awareness of the topic at the 2017 conference of the Case Management Society of America, at which the presentation was given. The discussion extended to the use of wearable technology designed to prevent workplace injuries, decrease the risk of re-injury and improve employee health. Demand is expected to cause a growth to nearly $70 billion by the year 2025.

Claims for workers’ compensation cover a wide array of injury types, from those caused by repetitive motions to the acute back or head injury. The response and claim amounts often rely on the knowledge of health professionals and patient advocates. Workers’ compensation benefits may be made available to cover a variety of new treatment modalities beyond lost wages and standard care. Wearable technologies are a relatively new and not yet well-recognized field among many professionals. Seeking the help of an attorney with experience pursuing claims and knowledge of medical advancements may result in a faster recovery with more comprehensive workers’ compensation benefits.